2013 Spring

The 2013 NEHA spring conference was Saturday, April 20, 2013, hosted by Westfield State University in Westfield, MA.

Download the program as a PDF

FINALIZED CONFERENCE PROGRAM – last updated 4/19/2013

All conference events in Scanlon and Parenzo Halls

REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:00-8:30 a.m. Scanlon Banquet Hall

MORNING SESSIONS I: 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

 

Session 1: Regulating the Other in Early America (Loughman Living Room)

Chair and Commentator: Robert Imholt, Albertus Magnus College

“The Slave Trade Act of 1794: Testing Federal Authority in the Early National Period”

Sarah Batterson, University of New Hampshire

“The Jay Treaty Revisited: Treaty-Making and Popular Constitutionalism”

Amanda Demmer, University of New Hampshire

“An Occupied Republic: The Persistence of the Quebec Act into the Federalist Era”

John C. Kotruch, University of New Hampshire

Session 2. The Power of Poetics (Scanlon A)

Chair and Commentator: Erika Briesacher, Worcester State University

“Equality is But a Word: Poetry and Politics in the Black Power and Chicano Movements”

Christopher Tucker, Clark University

“Informed Imagination: Using Historical Fiction to Better Understand New England Puritanism”

Priscilla A. Herrington, Salem State University

Session 3: Understanding Organizing (Scanlon B)

Chair and Commentator: TBA

“’The Man Who Works Is the Man Who Wins’: Reflections on the Life and Work of Harry Clark Bentley, the Founder of Bentley University”

Clifford Putney, Bentley University

“Fragmentation and Solidarity: Exploring American Labor History and Historiography”

Adam Lee Cilli, University of Maine

Session 4: Imagining the Other in World History (Scanlon C)

Chair and Commentator: Roland Higgins, Keene State College

“Swan Song of Ancient China: The Celestial Emporium in a Daily Spanish Newspaper, ca. 1760-1780”

Nicholas Russell, Tufts University

“Necessary Barbarians: Herodotos and the invention of the Celts”

Erik Jensen, Salem State University

Session 5. “Learning is Not a Spectator Sport: Using New Technologies to Engage Students in History” (Parenzo 202)

Chair: Robert Maloy, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

“A China Wiki: Incorporating Social Media into AP and World Politics Courses”

Allison Evans, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

“PRS in History Teaching: Strategies for using a Personal Response System”

Kate Curtin, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

“Today’s Meet Meets History: Effective Strategies for Bringing Twitter into the History Classroom”

Joseph Emery, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Commentator: Jeremy Greene, Chelmsford High School, Chelmsford, MA

Session 6. Constructing Deviance in Early America (Parenzo 204)

Chair and Commentator: Candace Kanes, Maine Memory Network and Maine Historical Society

“’A Cursed Set of Heretics’ or Christian Martyrs? Early Quaker Women in the New England Region”

Heather Barry, St. Joseph’s College

“Dirty Deeds and Filthy Words: Sex, Punishment, and Character in Colonial Connecticut.”

Dominic DeBrincat, Southern Connecticut State University

“’UnChristian and Unhuman’: Slavery and Mastery in Colonial Quaker Discourse”

Elizabeth Cazden, Roger Williams University

Session 7. Roundtable Discussion: “Teaching Social Studies in Massachusetts: The Impact of Testing, the Common Core, and Educational Reform on 6th-12th Social Studies” (Parenzo 208)

Participants:

Mara Dodge, Westfield State University

Nicholas Aieta, Westfield State University

 

BREAK FOR BOOK EXHIBIT & REFRESHMENTS 10:00-10:30 Scanlon Hall

MORNING SESSIONS II 10:30-12:00

Session 8. Eighteenth-Century Political Economy (Loughman Living Room)

Chair and Commentator: Dominic DeBrincat, Southern Connecticut State University

“£200 Indet more then is Due Me: Taxation and Negotiation in Colonial Rhode Island”

Mark Kenneth Gardner, Western Rhode Island Civic Historical Society

“John Fisher and his Unusual Exploits in the American Revolution”

Tom Hardiman, Portsmouth Athenaeum

“An Expanded Horizon: Impact of the Peace of Utrecht and the 1713 Treaty of Portsmouth with the

Indians on Piscataqua Merchants”

Sandra Rux, Portsmouth Historical Society

Session 9. Recovering Local History (Scanlon A)

Chair and Commentator: Tona Hangen, Worcester State University

“Recovering a Sordid Past: Public Memory of Scollay Square and Coney Island”

Joan Ilacqua, University of Massachusetts-Boston

“Troubled Waters and Muted Pleasures: Revere Beach and Seaside Resorts during the WWII-era Coastal Dim-outs”

Mark Herlihy, Endicott University

“Constructing Portsmouth: Situating African Americans in Seacoast New Hampshire”

Barbara Ward, Moffatt-Ladd House

Session 10: Myths and Memories (Scanlon B)

Chair and Commentator: Bethany Jay, Salem State University

“Ruins of Memory: Reconstruction, The Urakami Cathedral, and Atomic Memory in Nagasaki, 1945-1960”

Chad R. Diehl, Emmanuel College

“Scholars v. Sites: Analyzing Interpretations of Revolutionary America at Historic Sites in Boston and Philadelphia”

Cameron M. Shirley, Elon University

Session 11. Twentieth-Century Century Politics (Scanlon C)

Chair and Commentator: Bruce Cohen, Worcester State University

“The 1948 Truman Campaign in Southern New England”

Philip Grant, City University of New York

“The Dangers of Releasing Pressure: The Internal Fragmentation of the German Center Party, 1925-1930”

Martin Menke, Rivier University

Session 12. History Education Beyond the Traditional Classroom (Parenzo 202)

Chair and Commentator: Woden Teachout, Union Institute and University

“Constructing Learning Environment around History: Exploring the Connections Between Natural, Environmental and Human History”

Benjamin Williams, Union Institute and University

“Fieldtrips and More: Teaching History at the Museum”

Victoria Hughes, Vermont Historical Society

Session 13. Charity and Indenture in Early America (Parenzo 204)

Chair and Commentator: Clifford Putney, Bentley University

“ ‘I Recommend to your Compassion:’ Charity in Governor Dummer’s War (1722-1725).”

Robert E. Cray, Montclair State University

“’Before They Go Forth into the Great World’: Nineteenth-Century Indenture and the Stages of Childhood”

Sarah Mulhall Adelman, Framingham State University

Session 14. “The NERC Archive Project: Establishing a History of the New England Renaissance Conference” (Parenzo 208)

Chair: Ashley Long, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“The NERC Archive Project & The Origins of NERC (1938-1958)”

Christopher Carlsmith, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“Myron Gilmore and the NERC Presidency, 1959-63”

Derek Winslow, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“A Presidency in Transition: Leaders of the NERC, 1983-1995”

Meghan Chapman, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

Session 15: Fashion and Fancy (Dever Stage)

Chair and Commentator: Elizabeth DeWolfe, University of New England

“Silkbrocade: Commoditization of the London Georgian Shoe and its Reception in Colonial America”

Kimberly S. Alexander, University of New Hampshire

“Fashioning Perception: Nineteenth Century Dress Embellishment And Women’s Social Positioning”

Astrida Shaffer, Independent Scholar

“Unraveling the Minister’s Cloak: Eighteenth-Century Clothing as Historical Documents”

Tara Vose, Saco Museum, Saco, Maine

 

12:00 – 1:30 p.m. LUNCH & BUSINESS MEETING Scanlon Banquet Hall

NEHA Officer Elections will take place at the luncheon

AFTERNOON SESSION 1:30-3:00

Session 16. Imagining the State in Early America (Loughman Living Room)

Chair and Commentator: Craig Bruce Smith, Brandeis University

“The Inception of Constitutionalism in Puritan Massachusetts (1630-1650)”

Seth M. Ridinger, Worcester State University

“Representation in Revolutionary New Hampshire: Defining the Foundations of Sovereignty”

Jordan A. P. Fransler, University of New Hampshire

Session 17: Representing Place (Scanlon A)

Chair and Commentator: Kristen Petersen, MCPHS University

“Is a Picture Really Worth a Thousand Words? Examining the Lack of Photographic Images Depicting the Native Communities of New England”

Arabeth Balasko, University of Massachusetts-Boston

“Tactile History Surrounds Us, But Do We Sense It?”

Jeffrey Hopper, Independent Scholar

“Wonderful Things: Glimpses into the Unexplored Collections of the Vaughan Homestead, Hallowell, Maine”

Ron Kley and Jane Radcliffe, Vaughan Homestead

Session 18. Film and Discussion: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, Mythic Hero (Dever Stage in Parenzo Hall)

Comment and Moderation of Audience Discussion: Richard D. Shubart, emeritus, Phillips Exeter Academy

Film: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the American Civil War

Session 19: Foreign Relations in Twentieth-Century Europe (Scanlon C)

Chair and Commentator: Michael McGuire, Salem State University

“The Narvik Debate and British Failure in Norway, 1940”

Erin Redihan, Clark University

“Do-Gooders: Frances and Laurence MacDaniels and the Response of American Progressives to the Refugee Crisis in Turkey, 1920-1921”

Douglas Slaybaugh, Saint Michael’s College

Session 20. Roundtable: “Challenges for the Small History Department: General Education, Assessment, Enrollment and Budgets” (Parenzo 202)

Chair: Mary C. Kelly, Franklin Pierce University

Elizabeth DeWolfe, University of New England

Mary C. Kelly, Franklin Pierce University

Douglas A. Ley, Franklin Pierce University

Martin Menke, Rivier University

Session 21: A Changing Autonomy: Native American Tribal Identity in the Colonial Northeast (Parenzo 204)

Chair and Commentator: Abby Chandler, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“Jaghte oghte, ‘Maybe Not’: Autonomy, Identity, and English- French-Native Relations in the Captivity Tale of Eunice Williams”

Mary-Kate Hazel, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“Hunters, Diplomats, and Warriors: The Continuity of Male Mohican Societal Roles from 1609 to 1796”

Kate DiTullio, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

“Captors and Captives in the Ohio Country”

Ashley Long, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

Session 22. New Dimensions in American Foreign Policy (Parenzo 208)

Chair and Commentator: Michael E. Neagle, University of Connecticut

“Dog Fancy: An Imperialist Impulse”

Amanda Vertullo, Emmanuel College*

An Empire for Liberty or The Seven Sins: Rethinking American Foreign Policy”

Catherine Shaw, University of Massachusetts-Lowell

ADJOURNMENT 3:00 pm

*undergraduate presenter